Worldwide Auctioneers
  1. 1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer

  2. 1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer

  3. 1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer

  4. 1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer

  5. 1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer

  6. 1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer

  7. 1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer

  8. 1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer

  9. 1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer

  10. 1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer

  11. 1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer

  12. 1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer

  13. 1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer

  14. 1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer

  15. 1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer

  16. 1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer

  17. 1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer

  18. 1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer

  19. 1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer

  20. 1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer

  21. 1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer

  22. 1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer

  23. 1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer

Lot Number
155

1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer
2017 The Texas Classic Auction

Offered Without Reserve
ESTIMATE: $25,000 - $35,000
CHASSIS NO: 56213
• Exceptional patina and wonderfully correct
• Dash-mounted original data plates
• Accessory trailer included

ADDENDUM: PLEASE NOTE: Trailer is sold on Bill of Sale only.

134.2 cid L-head inline four-cylinder engine, 60 HP, three-speed synchromesh manual transmission with two-speed transfer case and four-wheel drive, full floating front axle, semi-floating rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes; wheelbase: 80”


World War II Army Chief of Staff, General George C. Marshall, called it "America’s greatest contribution to modern warfare," and famous War correspondent Ernie Pyle wrote, “It does everything. It goes everywhere. It’s as faithful as a dog, as strong as a mule, and as agile as a goat.” These heroes from America’s past were speaking of the simplistic and utilitarian Jeep. Built at a rate of one every minute and a half, over 600,000 Jeeps were built from the muscular manufacturing plants of Willys-Overland and Ford from 1941 until 1945. As the Allies banked victories across Europe and the Pacific, the brass at Willys realized the activity at the bustling plant would gradually grind to a halt. With its battlefield reliability, durability and reputation, Willys resurrected the lively little four-wheeler at war’s end and marketed the new CJ model to farmers, ranchers and outdoorsmen, thus ensuring a bright future for Willys.

The first civilian Jeep, dubbed the CJ-2A, closely resembled the military MB version but was adorned with a handful of creature comforts and was produced from 1945 until 1949. Sales of the civilian Jeeps kept Willys factory workers busy, but a slump in sales necessitated a re-design. In 1949, Willys introduced the CJ-3A model that offered the driver more legroom, headroom and a one-piece windshield. As the motoring public embraced the redesigned Jeep, the U.S. War Department was keeping a close eye on the Korean peninsula and, on June 25, 1949, North Korea invaded the South. The U.S. Government again turned to Willys to supply the military with utility vehicles and the first post-WWII military Jeep was put into production. The new M38 was a beefed-up version of the CJ-3A with a reinforced frame and stronger suspension, and featured a folding windshield, a pintle hook for towing, lifting shackles, and a waterproof ignition and breathing apparatus for fording streams. The M38 was produced from 1950 until 1952 and over 60,000 were supplied to the U.S. and other militaries.

This incredible example wears a breathtaking patina and is correct down to the waterproof ignition wires and dash-mounted original data plates. The pioneer tools, consisting of an axe and shovel, are present, as is the jerrycan, omnidirectional spare tire, convoy light and blackout lights. The marking, VMF214, indicates that this Jeep may have been assigned to the Marine Attack Squadron 214, better known as Blacksheep Squadron. Also included in the sale is a 1/4 ton M100 trailer that also wears VMF214 markings and is complete with its own set of blackout lights.

Vintage military Jeeps are fun to drive, easy to maintain; they fit in any size garage and can be accessorized with machine guns, radios and barbed wire cutters, to name a few. The last of the flat-fendered Jeeps may have rolled off the assembly line 65 years ago, but the legend lives on in the faithful presentation and mechanical reliability of this historic Jeep.

1952 Willys M38 Military Jeep with M100 Trailer
© Copyright 2017. All rights reserved.
The Worldwide Group.
worldwide-auctioneers.com
powered by TForce Solutions