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  1. 1966 Chevrolet Chevy II Nova SS L-79

  2. 1966 Chevrolet Chevy II Nova SS L-79

  3. 1966 Chevrolet Chevy II Nova SS L-79

  4. 1966 Chevrolet Chevy II Nova SS L-79

  5. 1966 Chevrolet Chevy II Nova SS L-79

  6. 1966 Chevrolet Chevy II Nova SS L-79

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  10. 1966 Chevrolet Chevy II Nova SS L-79

  11. 1966 Chevrolet Chevy II Nova SS L-79

  12. 1966 Chevrolet Chevy II Nova SS L-79

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  22. 1966 Chevrolet Chevy II Nova SS L-79

  23. 1966 Chevrolet Chevy II Nova SS L-79

  24. 1966 Chevrolet Chevy II Nova SS L-79

  25. 1966 Chevrolet Chevy II Nova SS L-79

Lot Number
163

1966 Chevrolet Chevy II Nova SS L-79
2017 The Texas Classic Auction

ESTIMATE: $100,000 - $125,000
CHASSIS NO: 118376N104742
• Renowned matching numbers L-79 327/350-HP four-speed powertrain
• Fully documented including original Protect-O-Plate
• Over $80,000 invested in recent rotisserie restoration
• One of the hottest 1960s performance cars

327 cid RPO L-79 V-8 engine, single Holley four-barrel carburetor, 350 HP, Muncie four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, hydraulic four-wheel drum brakes; wheelbase: 110”


Code-named ‘H-35’ with design and development heritage beginning in December of 1959, Chevrolet’s compact Chevy II began as a basic 'economy' car. Riding a 110-inch wheelbase, it was initially powered by four- and six-cylinder engines and formed Chevrolet’s competitor to the Ford Falcon. In August 1961, the first Chevy II rolled off the Willow Run, Michigan assembly line and it was the product of one of the fastest new-car development programs ever undertaken in General Motors history. Gradually offered with a wide variety of power, trim, and convenience options, the Chevy II was a huge success and found its way into the hearts of Chevy buyers with its value pricing, economy, sensible size, and sporty appeal. While Chevrolet General Manager Ed Cole introduced the Chevy II to the press on September 29, 1961 as offering “…maximum functionalism with thrift,” the Chevy II and its upmarket Nova series also provided maximum performance with minimal weight and cost when ordered with available V-8 engines or when modified for racing or street duty.

A new body design made the excellent little Chevy even better and more desirable than before with a crisp and sophisticated design theme quite similar in concept to that of the contemporary full-size Chevrolets. Trim was limited yet highly effective, allowing the Chevy II’s bold bodylines to speak for themselves. Options and passenger amenities were plentiful, allowing buyers to literally have a Chevy II built to their individual needs and preferences. The upscale Nova built upon the more basic Chevy II with heightened trim and more plush interior appointments. Performance fans gravitated to the Super Sport, which brought a sporty persona with color-accented wide body-sill moldings, wheel well trim, ‘SS’ scripts, badges, wheel covers, and front bucket seats with a floor console for automatic and four-speed cars. Famously, Chevy IIs and Novas quickly dominated drag strips in various classes, especially in Super Stock with Bill “Grumpy” Jenkins and in early “doorslammer” and then flip-top Funny Car form with legendary racer and showman “Jungle Jim” Liberman.

Although a wide selection of engine and transmission combinations were available for the Chevy II, Nova, and Nova SS, the definitive high-performance engine was the optional RPO L-79 327 V-8 with 350 horsepower. A high-winding, durable, and reliable power unit, the L-79 327 continues to be renowned as one of the finest performance engines ever designed and produced. Available only with a four-speed manual transmission, the L-79 327 featured free-breathing cylinder heads with 2.02-inch intake/1.60-inch exhaust valves, an aluminum intake mounting a 600-CFM Holley four-barrel carburetor and chromed twin-snorkel air cleaner, 11:1 compression, and a wild yet maintenance-free high-performance hydraulic cam – the first offered from an American auto manufacturer. On the street and strip alike, L-79-powered Chevy II Nova regularly outperformed many big-block rivals in a much lighter overall package, making it a potent combination. The L-79 option was also an outstanding value, adding just over $100 to the Nova’s already affordable base pricing. Summarized by respected author and historian Roger Huntington in American Supercar, the L-79 was “…one of the sweetest and best-performing small-block Chevy engines of that era,” concluding with just two words: “Tremendous engine.”

The outstanding product of a total rotisserie restoration performed with an investment of more than $80,000, this 1966 Chevy II Nova SS L-79 was a 71,000 actual-mile car at the time it was completed during 2014. Retaining the matching numbers RPO L-79 high-performance engine with power routed through a four-speed manual transmission and 12-bolt Positraction rear end, the car also comes with the original Protect-O-Plate. A true high-performance legend with a recent and total restoration, it is an outstanding example of 1960s Chevy muscle in a lightweight, small-block package.

1966 Chevrolet Chevy II Nova SS L-79
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