1. 1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Newport Town Car

  2. 1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Newport Town Car

  3. 1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Newport Town Car

  4. 1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Newport Town Car

  5. 1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Newport Town Car

  6. 1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Newport Town Car

  7. 1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Newport Town Car

  8. 1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Newport Town Car

  9. 1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Newport Town Car

  10. 1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Newport Town Car

  11. 1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Newport Town Car

  12. 1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Newport Town Car

  13. 1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Newport Town Car

  14. 1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Newport Town Car

  15. 1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Newport Town Car

  16. 1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Newport Town Car

  17. 1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Newport Town Car

Lot Number
62
Coachwork by Brewster
1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Newport Town Car
Scottsdale Auction

ESTIMATE: $175,000 - $225,000
CHASSIS NO: S209PR
• 1 of 11 built
• Fully documented car
• Known ownership history from new

468 cid OHV inline six-cylinder engine, three-speed manual transmission, solid front axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, live rear axle with cantilever leaf-spring platform suspension, four-wheel servo-assisted brakes; wheelbase: 146.5”


Rolls-Royce literally conquered the world with the incredible 40/50. Introduced in 1906, the 40/50 was a car that set a new world standard in durability and performance as it earned its exalted title of the “Silver Ghost.” By 1926, after a full twenty years in production, Rolls-Royce decided that a new car was in order. Introduced as the New Phantom, it featured a larger engine, but retained all the fine engineering that had built the Rolls-Royce reputation. The Phantom I remained in production until 1931 when the Phantom II came about. It was only then that the company began referring to the New Phantom as the Phantom I, a car that had no equal, as Rolls-Royce had by now earned the reputation as “The Best Car in the World.”

Offered here to the astute collector of fine motorcars is chassis number S209PR, a 1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Newport town car with coachwork by renowned Brewster of New York. This elegant town car is a Springfield-built example and is just 1 of 11 Phantoms produced with the Newport town car coachwork. Chassis S209PR is a late production example and according to documentation is the 32nd from the last Springfield car built. Brewster’s elegant styling on the Newport is dramatic with its low roof line, radically raked windscreen, and the signature Brewster “sweep” to the bonnet that’s beautifully accented in chrome. Bullet-shaped headlamps identify it as a Springfield-built Phantom and stylish bi-plane bumpers add a touch of simplistic sophistication. Its running boards are clean, thanks to a single rear-mounted spare wheel tucked neatly at the rear. The coachwork is nicely accented with black fenders and roof while a dark blue accentuates the body, a paint scheme that highlights its graceful coachwork.

Not only is this car elegant in all its fine glory, but its pedigree is beyond question as its ownership is traced back to its first owner, a Mr. S.J. Gaines who took delivery on January 13th, 1934. Mr. Gaines used the Phantom I for one year when he sold it to Ms. Belle Beacon, who again used it for just one year when it found its third owners with Ira and Constance Nelson. The Brewster Phantom was certainly right at home with the Nelsons, as Constance was the former Mrs. Paul Guggenheim and Mr. Nelson was a prominent Chicago meatpacking heir, philanthropist, and a diplomat. The Phantom remained with the Nelsons until 1946 and then went to York Wilson of Washington, D.C., where it stayed in the family until 1978. Under this long-term ownership the Phantom became the unofficial class mascot of their daughter Minerva Wilson in her college years. After several owners S209PR was still in good running order, but cosmetically was showing its age. Its next owner was Stanley Franklin who immediately recognized its historical importance and commissioned a full restoration with White Post Restorations in 1980. During its recommissioning, expenses mounted and it found a new owner with Robert Pell, who completed the restoration at a total cost of $250,000, a tidy sum in the 1980s. Recently, S209PR was a crown jewel of a private West Coast collection and has been impeccably maintained both cosmetically and mechanically. Both the coachwork and interior present in beautiful condition and all the fine detailing that Brewster was known for is still intact. The sale of S209PR includes an original tool kit, service and repair manuals, restoration photos, and two large binders of extensive historical documentation.

Very few cars can attest to carrying their original coachwork and mechanicals for over 75 years, but this Phantom I is a car that can make this claim and more. Created in an era of aristocracy, it was a car that was built for the elite with an air of supremacy that it still exhibits today. For the very finest in an elegant motorcar with a pedigree to match, this Rolls-Royce Phantom I Newport Town Car is sure to make an impression on any show field while also being welcome at any RROC events and CCCA CARavan tours.

1931 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Newport Town Car
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